More DNA Discoveries and the History of Horses

Armenian horsemaster bringing tribute to Darius I of Persia  Behistun Inscription (515 BC)
Armenian horsemaster bringing tribute to Darius I of Persia
Behistun Inscription (515 BC)

Once I found out my dad’s DNA was of J2 Haplo group, I started to search for possible routes my ancestors may have taken to get from the middle east to England. I firmly believe we all descend from one man, Noah, and that he in turn descends from Adam. Why do I believe this? Well, because the Bible says this is the case (Genesis 1-11). Modern man has decided that he’s way too smart to believe such fairy tales, but if one is objective enough to look at the evidences of these stories they may be surprised. Universally, man has a common tradition that our great-grandfather (fill in the blank with the name which matches the particular people/culture) was rescued from a great flood, and there were 8 survivors from which one of them they descend. Most people groups have their own mythology involving a god who started their tribe. The god’s name is derived from the name of the first individual who began the clan. There are many oral traditions about the flood around the world. For example, when David Thompson, explorer for the Hudson Bay Company, traveled to the area where he found the Columbia River, he found many native Indian tribes there as well. They shared with him that their ancestor was caught in a flood and the Great Spirit put the rainbow in the sky as a Mark of Life to promise not to flood the earth again. David told them ‘we’ had that same story. This is recorded in David Thompsons journal.

Noah had three sons: Shem, Ham and Japheth. Japheth populated the north mostly, Shem the west of Asia and Ham the south areas. My interest for my DNA study is the Japhetic line. He is the father of all the European nations. His name lives on in Greek and Roman mythology as Jupiter/Zeus and Iapetes and in India as Iyapeti or Pra-Japati. Japheth had 7 sons: Gomer who populated, first, the area of Galatia in middle Turkey and further to France formerly known as Gaul; Magog, who went north and populated Scandinavia and Russia; Javan, who became the seafaring people in Greece, Cyprus and Crete; Medai, who populated northern Iran; Tubal, who fathered the Bulgarians, Hungarians, Albanians, Romanians, and others; Meshech, from which Moscow takes its name; and Tiras who became the Thracians and possibly the Etruscans of Italy.

Further, Gomers  three sons are listed as: Ashkenaz, who populated the area of Armenia first and then went to Europe where they populated Germany (German Jews call themselves Ashkenazi Jews); Riphath, who populated areas of Turkey and then Czechoslovakia and Romania; and last Togarmah, for whom there is quite an abundance of tradition among his descendants largely in Turkey and Armenia. Then, the sons of Javan: Elishah, for which the Greek translation is Hellas and his descendants settled in Greece; Tarshish, who settled in Spain; Kittim, who fathered the people of Cyprus; and Dodanium who settled Rhodes and the Dardanelles.

Togarmahs sons
Togarmahs sons

The man I’m interested in is Togarmah, the father of the Turks, Armenians, Georgians, people of Dagestan,  Azerbijanis, the Iberians, and the people of the Caucasus including the Chechens and Ingush. The J2 haplo group is mainly concentrated in these areas with highest concentrations in the Ingush and Chechens.

Togarmah had several sons who settled between the Black and Caspian Seas. The Armenians say that their ancestor is the first son of Togarmah: Haik for which their native land is named Hyak. The second son is Kartlos, the father of the Georgians. Lakos is the father of the Lek tribes of Dagestan and Azerbijan. Hereti is the father of the Georgians and Albanians. Caucasus was the father of the Chechens and the Ingush and Egros was the father of the Iberians.

The Armenians are known for their skill in breeding horses. They were known for the use of horses in battle as were the Mongols and the Huns who occupied vast lands across north Asia and Europe.

Horses in Armenia
Horses in Armenia
Mongolians on horses
Mongolians on horses

Then we have the Spanish and their relationship with the horse, from which the whole American horse culture descends. The name of the Spanish peninsula is Iberia. Where does this ancient name come from? Above we see that Togarmah had a son Egros who is reported to be the father of a people called the Ibers living in the area of Eastern Turkey. At least some of these people obviously migrated to the Spanish peninsula and perhaps took their horses with them. Of course horse culture in Spain was heavily influenced by the Arabs who are well-known for their beautiful horse breeds.

Arabian horses
Arabian horses
Syrian man with an Arabian horse
Syrian man with an Arabian horse
Spanish Andalusian Horse
Spanish Andalusian Horse
Traditional Spanish riding clothes
Traditional Spanish riding clothes

We know that the Spanish brought the horse to the Americas and the cowboy was birthed out of the Mexican Vaqueros.

Mexican Vaqueros - 1880s
Mexican Vaqueros – 1880s
Mexican Vaqueros 1901
Mexican Vaqueros 1901

As the horse population grew it became popular with the Native Indians. This is where my dads story comes in.

Picture taken 1907
Picture taken 1907

My dad rode horses growing up and he and his friends used to go over to the Indian Reserve and rustle wild horses. Don’t tell anyone. Here’s a picture of him on one of the wild horses he caught.

Dad on his wild horse Babe
Dad on his wild horse Babe

So that’s my theory about my ancestors and their connection with horses. It’s fun to wonder about anyway.

Sources and further reading:

Excerpt from David Thompsons diary

The Re-population of the earth after the flood

Flood Traditions of the World by Arthur Custance

Armenian tradition

Armenians skill for breeding horses

Ural-Altaic Language map

Spanish horses

J2 Haplo group in Europe

Vaqueros-the cowboy

A great site for ranch and horse photos

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5 thoughts on “More DNA Discoveries and the History of Horses

  1. Homestead Ramblings

    This is fascinating! Such dedicated research and history. Got to love the pic of your dad on his horse 🙂 I learned a lot today!

    1. Thanks for your comment. I agree. I find all of this fascinating too, and I’ve learned so much. I knew about the Table of Nations, but as I began to look into ancient genealogies I discovered there was a lot of information out there. Arthur Custance was my first source of inspiration about this topic with his Doorway Papers. He was an amazing man. Always nice to hear your feedback. God bless your weekend!

  2. Reblogged this on Gold Must be Tried by Fire and commented:
    Great rampage through the Genesis history. As well underscored, there is no excuse whatever to take Genesis as anything other than history, written down in the toledoth form and handed down through the generations to Moses who received them, edited them where necessary, and compiled them. Great research Darce, and an awesome picture of you dad!

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