the French Connection – Part 5 – Champlain in Quebec 1608

1608 – Samuel Champlain, explorer and first governor of New France, founds Quebec

From Wikipedia:

In the spring of 1608, Dugua wanted Champlain to start a new French colony on the shores of the St. Lawrence. Dugua equipped, at his own expense, a fleet of three ships with workers, that left the French port of Honfleur. The main ship, called the Don-de-Dieu (the Gift of God), was commanded by Champlain. Another ship, the Lévrier (the Hunt Dog), was commanded by his friend Du Pont. The small group of male settlers arrived at Tadoussac on the lower St. Lawrence in June. Because of the dangerous strength of the Saguenay River ending there, they left the ships and continued up the “Big River” in small boats bringing the men and the materials.[29]

Commemorative Plaque for Samuel Champlain in Honfleur, France
Commemorative Plaque for Samuel Champlain in Honfleur, France

On July 3, 1608, Champlain landed at the “point of Quebec” and set about fortifying the area by the erection of three main wooden buildings, each two stories tall, that he collectively called the “Habitation“, with a wooden stockade and a moat 12 feet (4 m) wide surrounding them. This was the very beginning of Quebec City. Gardening, exploring, and fortifying this place became great passions of Champlain for the rest of his life.

First Habitation in Quebec built by Samuel Champlain
First Habitation in Quebec built by Samuel Champlain
Reconstruction of the Habitation
Reconstruction of the Habitation
 The habitation in winter by William Harvey Sadd
The habitation in winter by William Harvey Sadd

In the 1620s, the Habitation at Quebec was mainly a store for the Compagnie des Marchands (Traders Company), and Champlain lived in the wooden Fort Saint Louis newly built up the hill (south from the present-day Château Frontenac Hotel), near the only two houses built by the two settler families (the ones of Louis Hébert and Guillaume Couillard, his son-in-law).

Turret remnant of Champlain's second habitation
Turret remnant of Champlain’s second habitation
Model of reconstruction of Quebec in 1635 by Michel Bergeron
Model of reconstruction of Quebec in 1635 by Michel Bergeron
Another model of Chateau St. Louis
Another model of Fort St. Louis
Statue of Champlain in Quebec City near the Chateau Frontenac Grand Hotel
Statue of Champlain in Quebec City near the Chateau Frontenac Grand Hotel
Painting of Champlains arrival by George Agnew Reid 1909
Painting of Champlain’s arrival by George Agnew Reid 1909

 

 From Wikipedia:

Many sites and landmarks have been named to honour Champlain, who remains, to this day, a prominent historical figure in many parts of Acadia, Ontario, Quebec, New York, and Vermont. They include:

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14 thoughts on “the French Connection – Part 5 – Champlain in Quebec 1608

  1. Pierre Lagacé

    Thanks for mentioning my 10th grandfather…

    Louis Hébert (1575 – 1627) is my 10th great grandfather
    Guillemette Hébert daughter of Louis Hébert
    Élisabeth Couillard daughter of Guillemette Hébert
    Marie-Madeleine Guyon daughter of Élisabeth Couillard
    Marie Hayot daughter of Marie-Madeleine Guyon
    François Marchand (1685 – 1748) son of Marie Hayot
    Antoine Marchand (1739 – ) son of François Marchand
    Pierre Marchand son of Antoine Marchand
    Marguerite Marchand (1811 – 1882) daughter of Pierre Marchand
    Henriette Alexandre (1845 – 1907) daughter of Marguerite Marchand
    Léo Lagacé (1888 – 1964) son of Henriette Alexandre
    Léo Lagacé (1927 – 1995) son of Léo Lagacé
    Pierre Lagacé son of Léo Lagacé

    1. Wow, you have a very significant ancestor to Quebec City. I just read about him in that Wikipedia article. I also remember reading about him in Cyprien Tanguay’s genealogical history. I’ll have to take a look at your tree again. I know I have a Hebert in my tree, but it’s a woman, so I’m not sure how she relates.

    1. Hi Sue, thanks for your comment and yes I will change the spelling…..lol. I hate it when that happens. Cool you saw the statue. I don’t remember seeing it when I was there, but that was a long time ago.

  2. Pingback: Essex Settled 1765 | Essex on Lake Champlain

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